HVAC Denver Metro

Posted in HVAC Contractors Denver on January 30, 2018
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You're a homeowner and determined your home's air conditioning needs fixing or needs to be replaced with a newer, more efficient system. You're all set to get moving. What's the optimal way to get a high quality HVAC contractor who will do a good job for a fair price? What could you look for in an air conditioning contractor to obtain this work? Denver Metro 

Furnace Specialist

When homeowners choose to repair an air conditioning system or replace the unit with a newer one, they're often plagued by worries that their family will swelter while the job is completed.  These concerns are perfectly normal and common among many homeowners looking for HVAC fixes or air conditioner repair specialists.

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Furnace Specialist Most homeowners think of a broken furnace as one that stops functioning, but that is not always the case. In addition to mechanical failure, there can also be subtle indications that repair is in a furnace's future, that the unit is actually broken but still appears to be functioning. If your furnace displays one or more of the signs below, you should consider it as an indicator that it may need repair, and schedule an appointment with an HVAC technician as soon as possible:The Unit Makes Unusual NoisesNo furnace is completely silent. If you hear unusual banging, whining, or groaning noises emanating from your furnace, it may be a sign that it has difficulty igniting, has a loose belt, or has a worn out part that will soon break. If the noises are caused by something else, you may need to call Ghostbusters instead of an HVAC company. You Need to Set Your Thermostat Higher than NormalWhen a home stops heating well, the response of most homeowners is to raise the thermostat setting. As the problem grows worse, though, even the highest setting can fail to deliver warmth. Before your home reaches this point, have a furnace repair technician perform an inspection. The problem may be a faulty thermostat, a problem with an intermittent pilot ignition system, or even leaky ductwork.Your Energy Bills are Inordinately HighIf your electrical bills are high this winter, it may be because your air distribution fan will not kick off, or because you raise the thermostat setting to compensate for a lack of heat. It could also be that your furnace performs inefficiently due to a clogged air filter or leaky ducts. Instead of paying a utility bill that matches your mortgage payment, call a repair technician instead.The Pilot Light is YellowIf you inspect your furnace and notice that the pilot light is yellow, it may indicate the presence of carbon monoxide. A blue flame indicates the gas mixture is normal; a yellow flame indicates it is not. If carbon monoxide is detected, the technician can determine whether your HVAC equipment or your home is the source of the problem.The Unit has Trouble Kicking On or Staying On If your furnace takes a long time to kick on, or it kicks on as usual but it does not stay on, a broken thermostat, faulty wiring, or a pilot light ignition problem could be to blame. There could also be a problem with the distribution fan motor. Like the other problems in this list, a furnace that has trouble kicking on usually gets worse over time.ConclusionThe need for furnace repair usually occurs at the most inopportune time-when your furnace is busy heating your home. Ann Atlanta heating and air conditioning company that specializes in HVAC repair should be able diagnose and fix the problem quickly. For homeowners, the key is to recognize signs that indicate a furnace needs repair, and schedule an HVAC inspection before it stops working.

Gas Furnaces Repair - Common Problems and Their Solutions

Furnace Diagnosis Gas furnaces use either propane or natural gas to heat enclosed living areas. While gas is often talked about as an expensive means of heat, gas furnaces typically burn cleaner than oil furnaces and therefore present their owners with less repairs than oil furnaces. But when problems do occur with gas furnaces, they're typically easy to identify and aren't labor intensive to correct. Below are four issues that commonly arise with older gas furnaces and what you can expect in terms of repairs.A Furnace Produces No HeatIf your gas furnace produces no heat, chances are that it's experiencing one of the following issues: a closed control valve, a blown fuse or tripped circuit, a faulty thermostat or a non-working pilot light. While you could correct these problems yourself, it's best to call a gas furnaces repair service (i.e. a heating and cooling company) if you aren't experienced with gas furnaces. Regardless of which of the above issues your furnace is experiencing, an HVAC repair technician should be able to fix the problem on the same day, and none of the above issues will result in a significant repair cost. A Furnace Produces Insufficient HeatIf your furnace has been producing less heat, it could be because the blower is occluded, the blower belt is loose or because the filter or burner is dirty. These problems can also occur in unison. As with a furnace that produces no heat, a furnace that produces insufficient heat resulting from one of the above issues can usually be fixed on the same day at minimal cost. If a gas furnaces repair technician indicates that the problem stems from one of the above issues but that some of the other issues appear immanent, save money and have all of them repaired in one visit.A Furnace Keeps Switching On and OffIf your furnace switches on and then switches off before producing the desired level of heat, it likely suffers from one of the following problems: a clogged blower, a dirty filter or an overly dry motor. In the first case, a technician will clean out your blower and its surrounding area using a vacuum; in the second case, the technician will replace your temporary air filter or clean and reinsert your permanent air filter; in the third case, the technician will lubricate the motor by placing oil in the necessary oil ports. In each case, the service cost should again be minimal. A Furnace's Pilot Light Won't Come OnWith most furnaces, you can tell if a pilot light is on by kneeling to the floor and looking at the underside of the furnace, where you'll see a small blue flame emanating from a small pipe if the pilot light is running. A pilot light that won't light is generally caused by one of three issues: a clogged pilot opening, insufficient gas flow due to an improperly set gas valve or a damaged thermocouple. In each case, the remedy is requires light labor and can be fixed at minimal cost. Gas Furnace Replacement Company

HVAC Contractors Denver

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